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The Jury by Norman Rockwell

The Jury by Norman Rockwell
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February 14, 1959 Issue of The Saturday Evening Post


The Jury, a Norman Rockwell painting , appeared on the cover of The Saturday Evening Post published February 14, 1959. This is another timeless favorite of Rockwell collectors, a classic for all the ages.

This painting was Rockwell's 304th overall out of 322 total paintings that were published on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post. Rockwell's career with the Post, spanning 47 years, began with his first cover illustration, Boy With Baby Carriage in 1916 and continued through his last, Portrait of John F. Kennedy, in 1963.

This was also the first cover for The Post in 1959. In 1959, there were four Norman Rockwell Saturday Evening Post covers published.

The original oil on canvas painting, 53 x 49 inches or 134.6 x 124.4 cm, is part of a private collection.

This painting also appears in five Rockwell commentary books. It appears:

  • on pages 409 and 438 of Norman Rockwell 332 Magazine Covers by Christopher Finch,
  • on page 171 of The Norman Rockwell Album,
  • as illustration 208 of Norman Rockwell's America by Christopher Finch,
  • as illustration 525 of Norman Rockwell: Artist and Illustrator by Thomas Buechner and
  • on page 222 of Norman Rockwell, A Definitive Catalogue by Laurie Norton Moffatt.

Three studies is also reproduced on page 222 and 223 of the Norman Rockwell Catalogue.

Pristine original copies of this magazine cover bring good prices on eBay, when it is available. And to think it only cost fifteen cents originally! And it was mint condition then, too.




The Jury

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Available as Oil on Canvas:
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Norman Rockwell decided to tackle the judicial process in this painting.

Ah, the smoke and tension filled jury room. Ah, the lone holdout juror. The lone holdout preventing a unanimous verdict is also the only woman.

Apparently all of the male jurors have voted the same verdict.

Drawing on all their powers of persuasion, they are trying to convince the lady to change her vote.

She is having nothing of it. Her body language shows that she has made up her mind and is not changing her vote.

I do not blame her. A jury can vote not just on the facts of the case, but also the law itself.

It is her duty to vote her conscience, just as it is the duty of all jury members.

This is another self-portrait since we can see Rockwell painted himself as one of the jurors.

We also see Louie Lamone, Rockwell's friend, confidant and assistant, in the red shirt and jacket.

The female juror was modeled by Barbara Brooks. Her husband, Bob Brooks, was the model for the mustached man standing next to the sleeping juror.

Do you know names of any of the other jurors?


The February 14, 1959 Saturday Evening Post cover by Norman Rockwell entitled The Jury

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Norman Rockwell's The Jury (1959)
(Image Only) Copyright © 1959 Saturday Evening Post & Curtis Publishing Company



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Norman Rockwell Quotes:


I'll never have enough time to paint all the pictures I'd like to.

No man with a conscience can just bat out illustrations. He's got to put all his talent and feeling into them!

Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is. All I know is that whatever type of work I do, I try to give it my very best. Art has been my life.

Right from the beginning, I always strived to capture everything I saw as completely as possible.

The secret to so many artists living so long is that every painting is a new adventure. So, you see, they're always looking ahead to something new and exciting. The secret is not to look back.

I can take a lot of pats on the back. I love it when I get admiring letters from people. And, of course, I'd love it if the critics would notice me, too.

You must first spend some time getting your model to relax. Then you'll get a natural expression.

More at BrainyQuote.

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